NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell defended the $765 million concussion settlement between the league and retired players with brain injuries. Goodell said it was the best outcome for both parties, and scoffed at the idea that $765 million is an insignificant portion of what the league makes annually. 

"People start with making an assumption ... first off, that we make $10 billion," Goodell said Wednesday morning at a New York City event promoting Super Bowl XLIII. "That's $10 billion in revenue. And there's a difference between making (money) and revenue.

"So this is a significant amount of money (and) the plaintiffs also believed it was an appropriate amount. The mediator felt it was an appropriate amount. It's a tremendous amount of money that we think is going to go to the right purpose, which is helping players and their families. So $765 million is a lot of money."

 

Brian Urlacher admitted Bears players faked injuries to slow down high-powered offenses. 

 

Alabama wide receiver Kenny Bell had a bizarre past couple of days, quitting and rejoining the team over Twitter.

 

 

 

Hall of Famer Chris Mullin is joining the Sacremento Kings front office in some kind of senior advisory role. 

 

Kings rookie Ben McLemore changed his number from 16 to 17, which has some suspecting it means the Kings plan on retiring Peja Stojakovic's jersey. 

 

The Angels can drop the "of Anaheim" from their team name after a lease renegotiation with the city of Anaheim. 

 

Eddie Lacy is listed as the Packers starting running back.

 

Neither the 49ers nor the Titans are saying too much about this lawsuit against Aldon Smith and Delanie Walker that alleges they instigated a shooting that resulted in two people getting shot.   

 

A stabbing outside of Houston at Spring High School left one student dead and three others injured. 

 

It looks like every time George Zimmerman gets pulled over for speeding, we're going to find out about it

 

A Ku Klux Klan organizer paid $50 to join a Wyoming NAACP chapter.

 

Salon has analysis on a group of House Republicans trying to bog down Obamacare enrollment specialists in states with the highest uninsured populations.

 

Earl Sweatshirt performs with Frank Ocean and Mac Miller.