Dallas Cowboys’ owner Jerry Jones has certainly made a stink this season.

Jones has been disingenuous with his players. One day, he kneeled with them before the national anthem. The next day, he went public and promised to bench any player that kneeled during the national anthem.

Yes, Jones doesn’t care about issues affecting the black community. Jerry only cares about Jerry.

That’s why most of his wrath has been against NFL commissioner Roger Goodell.

Not only has Jones, regarded as the most powerful owner in the league, been upset over the six-game suspension of his star running back, Ezekiel Elliott, but Jones has made his fight with Goodell a public one.

Oh yes. Dirty sheets and all.

Jones is at the center of why the commissioner’s extension hasn’t been finalized. It should have happened back in September. But here we are now and Christmas is coming soon.

Bleacher Report on Twitter

Multiple owners have discussed possibility of forcing Jerry Jones to forfeit Cowboys franchise 😳, per @ProFootballTalk https://t.co/pVt6nULxto

And let’s get one thing right. This is personal and has to do with Jones not being happy with the idea that one of his star players won’t be able to play. Jones has denied that. The fact remains that it is.

Still, Jones is right about one thing. Goodell should be fired.

This commissioner, the one that makes around $40 million a season, has botched so many big incidents in the league.

And we’re not talking the business side. Because of the enormous TV deals, the NFL, as a business, runs itself. No matter who the commissioner is, that league would print money.

Hence, you need a commissioner who will watch over the game closely and be out in front on anything that could damage the league’s image with the public.

That’s where Goodell - whose current contract expires in March 2019 - has failed miserably.

The players’ protests are Exhibit A. Goodell really didn’t get it or care enough to find out why players were following Colin Kaepernick’s lead in protesting police brutality, racism and social injustice in the black community.

Instead, Goodell buried his head in the sand. Instead of being a proactive commish, he has been a reactive one. And most times, he’s a day late and a dollar short.

One big mistake by Goodell is that he didn’t think of what could happen when it appears that the owners decided to blackball Kaepernick from the league, make an example of him.

The players aren’t dumb and what the owners have done goes against everything the players have been taught - the best players make the team.

Plus, it cut players deep that it’s OK to be a felon, domestic abuser or use drugs, but not OK to stand up for your community in a peaceful way.

It just makes no sense.

Somehow, this commissioner forgot his league is 70% black.

And time and time again, Goodell has blown it when the league needed him to be solid and authoritative.

Enter the Ray Rice case. Goodell rendered a weak two-game suspension before seeing the video in the elevator of Rice assaulting his then-girlfriend.

There was Spygate. Most thought the New England Patriots got off easy for cheating. Goodell looked bad.

Bountygate was another fumble by Goodell. He handed out harsh suspensions, only to have to reduce most of them for lack of evidence. LB Jonathan Vilma was suspended for the entire 2012 season, but only served a five-game suspension.

Then there was Deflategate, in which Pats’ QB Tom Brady was suspended four-game for his scheme to deflate the ball under league standards.

Goodell, again, was beat up publicly over it as the NFL just didn’t seem to have enough solid evidence to convince fans the commish had caught Brady.

Peter King on Twitter

Jerry Jones v Roger Goodell. Blood may be spilled. By @albertbreer. https://t.co/hd7wVzwqba

Enter the Elliott case. Many believe the NFL just doesn’t have enough in this domestic violence case. Goodell’s past blunders no doubt give people the right to question him here.  

Despite all these mishandled situation, Goodell is asking for a king’s ransom to stick around, including a $50-million a year salary and private jet for life, according to ESPN. 

In the end, the owners will more than likely re-sign him and give him a boatload of money. Not because of the good job he has done, but because they hate to be told what to do.

Had Goodell been forceful enough, warned the owners about the ramifications of what they appeared to have done to Kap, this league would be in a better place.

That said, Jones is right on Goodell.