MLB commissioner Bud Selig announced he will retire when his contract expires on Jan. 25, 2015, leaving a position he held since 1992. 

Selig ushered in the Divisional era in baseball as well as helped create Jackie Robinson Day and interleague play. He also brought instant replay to the game which is set to broaden in scope next season, and expanded the Wild Card round to bring more teams into the playoffs.

Ultimately, however, Selig will likely be remembered for overseeing the Steroid Era in baseball, which was essentially the entire length of his tenure, and for the memorable tie at the All-Star game in 2002. That game brought about the changes that made the All-Star game count for home-field advantage in the World Series, a decision that hasn't had the intended effect of making the games more competitive. 

Though divisions expanded the playoffs at the time, many critics question their validity when divisions like the AL East get stacked with strong teams and wining records, while other clubs cruise to the playoffs on backs of weak squads. 

Selig accomplished a great deal during his time as commissioner, but MLB will need a more charismatic leader to bring the sport out of it's lulls and into the digital era.