With the over-the-top hype and media parade that followed Ben Simmons as he made his journey to the NBA after satisfying the NBA’s minimum age requirements with a quick bullet at LSU where he averaged 19.2 points, 11.8 rebounds, 4.8 assists and 2.0 steals per game, to say that his professional rookie season has been a disappointing bust is being polite.



No, it’s not his fault  that after missing the first 56 games of the season, Philly announced that the hardwood savior was ruled out for the remainder of the 2016-17 campaign on Friday due to a foot injury.

But Philly fans endured an obvious tank job by their organization to position themselves to be able to get Simmons and I'm sure they wanted more for their efforts than another No.1 pick  (joining Joel Embiid) that they have to coddle because of injuries. 

It's like torture. Philly hasn't been good since Iverson was running the show. Magic Johnson compared Simmons to LeBron James and the top analysts and experts agreed. Philly wants to see the young Don on that court, but it won't be this season. "Wait till next year" has become the anthem in Philly. 

According to Bob Cooney of the Philadelphia Daily News, Sixers general manager Bryan Colangelo said Simmons will not play this season since a scan did not show full healing in his foot.

Simmons underwent surgery to repair a broken bone in his right foot in October.

Philadelphia drafted the 20-year-old Simmons first overall after a single season at LSU that saw him average 19.2 points, 11.8 rebounds, 4.8 assists and 2.0 steals per game.

While Philly is just 21-35 this season with a young nucleus that includes Embiid, center Jahlil Okafor and forward Dario Saric, the future is still potentially bright with Simmons on deck. 

When he does finally hit the hardwood, the expectations and thirst in Philly for something more than a rebuild will be at a boiling point. The 2017-18 season will be a pivotal one in Sixers franchise history. If Simmons is not healthy enough to play, then ring the alarm because you can't miss on No. 1 picks in the NBA and survive for too long.