A year ago, Baylor University's disgraced football coach Art Briles was fired in the wake of the school's unconscionable sexual assault scandal. Athletic director Ian McCaw resigned and president Ken Starr eventually resigned as well. 

Baylor regents told the Wall Street Journal last year that 17 women accused 19 football players of assault since 2011. But a January lawsuit filed against the university alleges that a disgustingly mind-numbing 52 acts of rape were perpetrated by at least 31 different football players. 

Now, a new Title IX lawsuit has been filed, bringing the total number of suits against Baylor up to seven. 

The latest sordidness, which was served on Tuesday, claims that the plaintiff, who was a former volleyball player at the university, was drugged and raped in 2012 at an off-campus apartment by at least four, and as many as eight, football players.

The plaintiff also said during the investigation that there is "at least one video" of two female students being gang raped. 

The Waco Tribune reports that such rapes were part of a systematic hazing process and considered "a bonding experience by the players." 

This latest development comes just days after Baylor announced the "structural completion of the 105 recommendations related to the institution's response to sexual violence and implementation of best-practice governance policies and procedures." 

As more cases come to the forefront, the shocking, lawless criminality by the players who perpetrated these crimes, and the coaches and administrators who looked the other way, is one of the most heinous college sports stories ever.

If there was ever a case that warranted a college football program getting the death penalty, this sure is it.