Ray Lewis is a true legend on and off the field. His play stands for itself and his charitable works are remarkable.
 
However, it seems no matter what the star LB does, he’ll always be haunted by the events surrounding that fateful night in Atlanta during the weekend of the 2000 Super Bowl. Two young men were murdered at a party Lewis was attending and he subsequently plead guilty to obstruction of justice in exchange for testimony.
 
I’m fine with the families of the victims still demanding answers from Lewis in reference to murders which are still unresolved. In the quotes recently given to the USA Today, it’s clear the families will not forget the young men, nor should they.
"His attitude during the deposition and everything wasn't that great," Katheryn Smith says of Lewis. "He disappointed me in the things he said. But I decided I wasn't the one (to judge). You have to leave that up to God, you know? He was there when it happened. I think they all got off fairly easy, but I don't have any hard feelings. I think he had a bad choice of friends."
Hopefully there will be a day where Lewis and these families can come to terms.
 
However, he doesn’t owe any of us any more answers. Even if he did, I wouldn’t want Anna Welker, the wife of Wes Welker asking anything. The Big Lead found Facebook postings from her blasting Lewis, bringing up his murder case and his children. I understand she’s upset her husband lost to the Ravens. I’m sure she was all packed and ready for a week in New Orleans. But trying to call out Ray Lewis and mention his family is uncalled for.
 
If anything she should be calling out Wes for that crucial drop he made in second half. Or maybe she should be worried about her beau getting re-signed next season. Nobody cares what a woman whose best contribution to society was winning a Miss Hooters Pageant thinks. Maybe she was just trying to make one of those wife reality shows, but she really should keep her thoughts to herself.
 
Anna, you’ve made your living off being attractive. So do more of that and less talking.