Russell Wilson accomplishing amazing things is becoming very typical.

So typical in fact that doubters have treated his first few seasons as a Super Bowl QB like an NFL combine, often looking for weaknesses in his game rather than acknowledging the greatness that got him to this point.

No QB and no team in the salary-cap era has ever been to three consecutive Super Bowls.

Contrary to past dissenting opinions about who does the heavy lifting for Seattle, there is no doubt that Wilson has been dragging his solid-but-flawed team along for the historic ride this year.


Traveling into Minnesota to play the NFC North Division champs on Sunday at 1:05 PM ET in the first NFL Wild Card playoff game is just more motivation for a QB who doesn’t know anything but winning, but has suffered enough hate and gut-wrenching loss to be more motivated than ever during this playoff run.  

If not for an epic fail by Seahawks offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell and the immortalization of Malcolm Butler, the NFL world would be buzzing about  the possibility of Wilson adding a third Lombardi Trophy and world championship to the mantle (well four if you consider Ciara a Super Bowl woman) in his first four seasons.

If Tom Brady is the game’s No. 1 winner, then Wilson is closing in on that claim, with many more seasons to go, and will be held in that rarefied air if he can continue to win games, will his team to victory and improve as a pigskin-slinger each season.

Entering last season’s crushing Super Bowl mishap, Wilson was already establishing himself as the toughest out in the game. Before that loss to Brady, Wilson was 10-0 in his career vs. Super Bowl winning quarterbacks (3-0 vs. Aaron Rodgers; 2-0 vs. Eli Manning; 2-0 vs. Peyton Manning; 2-0 vs. Drew Brees; 1-0 vs. Tom Brady).

He crushes the best comp, but he did it for the first three seasons without the Fantasy Football stats of the other veteran superstars. This season, however, Russ served up a career-high 4,024 yards passing, 34 TDs and an NFL-high 110.1 passer rating. He turned an average receiver like Doug Baldwin into the NFL's receiving touchdowns leader with 14. 

If Wilson keeps going, he has a shot at matching Brady’s postseason potency.

Brady is 4-2 in his six Super Bowl starts.The Seahawks are developing a similar winning formula to those New England Patriots teams. It’s all about continuity at the key spots.

Wilson and head coach Pete Carroll will be a problem for years to come. The Pats aren’t dominant every year, but the production of Brady and Belichick never changes. And new pieces are plugged in around them every year until a perfect championship blend is captured.  

In 2013, Seattle was dominant, especially on D, where “The Legion of Boom” elevated itself into the annals of great NFL defenses.

In 2014 there were coordinator changes, player losses and the Seahawks started 3-3 as the official transition of Wilson from game-manager to game-changer began. It was a step backwards to secure a fruitful future.

Seattle rebounded, winning nine of its final 10 games to grab the NFC West and the conference’s top seed. They went on a similar late tear this season after starting 4-5. Led by Wilson’s take-charge nature and aerial excellence, they finished 6-1 and held down a wild card bid.

On Sunday, Minnesota will get a chance to do something defenses don't usually do to Wilson come January; regulate his passing steez and yearly run at the record books.